www.landroverclub.com.ar

Fecha actual 31 Ago 2014, 01:14
Índice general » Todo sobre Nuestros Land Rover » Temas generales de nuestros vehiculos



Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 23 mensajes ]  Ir a página 1, 2  Siguiente
Autor Mensaje

Desconectado
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 07 Ago 2007, 17:16
Mensajes: 3760
Ubicación: Boulogne, Buenos Aires, Rep. Argentina

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 12:31 
Arriba  
Dada la evidencia objetiva de ello, siempre me hago la pregunta de cual es el motivo, y de si se puede hacer algo en aras de prevenir este tema.

Buscando encontré este texto sobre los anticongelantes, en inglés, al que dejo en su idioma original pero que se puede leer a través del traductor Google.

Acá describe una posible gelificación de los aditivos anticorrosivos siliconados, que terminan ayudando a tapar los cañitos. Será que a veces estamos pecando por exceso de refrigerante?
El cambio del mismo lo estamos realizando completo, o sin drenar todo el sistema?
Ah! y una descripción de los diferentes productos (organico, por ejemplo) que puede ayudar a aumentar nuestro conocimiento y cuidados.
Si alguno encuentra algun link interesante sobre este tema, invito a que lo cuelgue aquí


Saludos :grin: :cool:

I found a link to this information on Google, but the original article was no longer available. Thanks to the Google cache, the information was still available. To preserve it a bit longer and make it accessible to everyone here, the article text is below.

The Chemistry of Cooling Systems, Larry Carley, Underhood Service, October 1996

Ever wonder why thermostat housings, aluminum radiators, water pumps and cylinder heads become badly corroded? Why radiator hoses eat through from the inside out, or why radiators sometimes clog up with gunk? You'll find the answer in cooling system chemistry.


You don't need a Ph.D. in chemistry to appreciate the fact that the coolantcoolantcoolant that needs attention. In many cases, the stuff is loaded with rust and sediment and looks more like hot chocolate than coolant. But even when the coolant is still green and looks good as new, the corrosion-fighting additives are often found to be depleted when the coolant is tested. So don't judge the condition of the coolant by appearances alone - looks can be deceiving. in many vehicles today is badly neglected. Numerous surveys by manufacturers, aftermarket groups and even consumer organizations have found that about a third of all vehicles contain
If you test even further, you'll also find the concentration of antifreeze in the coolant varies wildly from the 50/50 mix recommended by most vehicle manufacturers. Out of every 12 vehicles, four on average either have too much water and not enough antifreeze, or too much antifreeze and not enough water. Another three or four may also be low on coolant.
One reason why the problem of coolant neglect is so rampant today is partly due to the fact that the average age of the U.S. vehicle fleet is well over nine years. Many vehicles have had only one or two coolant changes since they were new. And some are still pumping the same old tired coolant through their engines they had when they left the factory!
Coolant neglect also can be blamed on gas-and-go driving, extended service intervals and the elimination of many maintenance items that were once necessary to keep a vehicle in good running condition. Engines today no longer need annual tune-ups and few motorists see the need to winterize their vehicles. Consequently, many pay little or no attention to checking or changing the coolant until a problem occurs.
By the time you see these vehicles, the long-term effects of coolantcoolant.
neglect are usually self-evident - corroded and clogged radiators, eroded aluminum cylinder heads, water pumps and thermostat housings, rotten radiator hoses, leaky heater cores and freeze plugs - even blown head gaskets and chronic overheating. The root cause in most cases can be traced back to the poor condition of the

The Importance of the Mix


Though many people realize they need a certain amount of antifreeze in their cooling system to prevent the water from freezing during cold weather, many don't realize that antifreeze also helps prevent boilover during hot weather. Ethylene glycol, the main ingredient in conventional antifreeze, freezes at about 8 degrees F, boils at 330 degrees F and carries heat about 15 percent less efficiently than water.
Most vehicle manufacturers recommend a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and water for optimum year-round protection. A 50/50 mix provides freezing protection down to minus 34 degrees F and boilover protection to 228 degrees F. Straight water obviously provides no freezing protection, no boilover protection beyond 212 degrees F, and no corrosion protection. Therefore, as you know, straight water should never be used in a cooling system. Straight ethylene glycol antifreeze also should never be used because it needs to be mixed with water (35 percent or more) to lower the solution's freezing point. Straight antifreeze also cools less efficiently than a mixture of antifreeze and water. Running straight antifreeze can raise metal operating temperatures inside an engine 70 to 80 degrees, which may be enough to cause galling problems in the exhaust valves. The maximum concentration of antifreeze should never exceed 65 percent.


Measuring the Mixture


The only way to know if the coolant is properly mixed is to measure the strength or concentration of antifreeze with a hydrometer, floating ball gauge, test strip or refractometer. Then, and only then, can you determine if more antifreeze or more water is needed. Simply opening the radiator cap and dumping in some extra antifreeze for added freezing protection may put too much antifreeze in the mixture. Exceeding an 80 percent concentration of antifreeze in the coolant can cause silicate gelling. The silicate corrosion inhibiting additives that are found in most "aluminum-safe" antifreezes can drop out of suspension, forming a gel or greenish goo that clogs the radiator and reduces heat transfer.
Even if the old coolant is drained out of the radiator and the system refilled with the proper 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water, the coolant may still not have the correct ratio. Up to a third of the old coolant can remain in the engine if only the radiator is drained. Unless this residual coolant is flushed out, it can dilute the fresh coolant as well as contaminate it with accumulated rust and sediment.
A thorough job of revitalizing the coolant, therefore, requires more than adding fresh antifreeze to the radiator or doing a simple drain and fill. It requires flushing the system to remove all traces of the old coolant, cleaning the cooling system if necessary to remove accumulated rust and scale, then refilling the cooling system with a properly balanced mixture of water and new or recycled antifreeze.


Chemical Breakdown


The "anti" part of antifreeze applies not only to freezing and boilover protection but also corrosion protection. A typical jug of antifreeze contains 96 percent ethylene glycol by weight, two percent corrosion inhibitors (silicates, phosphates and/or borates) and two percent water (a little water is necessary to help blend the inhibitors with the glycol).
Antifreeze formulated for aluminum engines typically contain a much higher concentration of silicates than that formulated for cast-iron engines. This can sometimes cause silica gelling problems if an antifreeze designed for passenger cars and light trucks ends up in a heavy-duty diesel truck engine. Heavy-duty trucks typically specify a low silicate formula antifreeze because they have mostly cast-iron engine parts and brass radiators. A supplemental additive that contains silicate is then added to the system to provide the required corrosion protection. But if there's already a high silicate antifreeze in the system, the coolant can become over saturated with silicate causing the silicate to react with itself and gel.
Silicate solubility also decreases as the ratio of antifreeze to water increases. In coolant that's accumulated a lot of miles, this isn't as much of a problem because much of the silicate will have been used up. But with fresh antifreeze and water, using too much antifreeze and not enough water may create conditions that are ripe for gelling.


Fighting Corrosion


The rate at which corrosion takes place inside a cooling system depends on a number of factors: the presence of minerals and other impurities in the coolant; the type of metals and alloys in the engine and radiator, and the acidity or alkalinity of the coolant itself.
Acidity and alkalinity is measured on a "pH" scale, where 7 is neutral, lower numbers represent increasing acidity and higher numbers increasing alkalinity (pH is chemist talk for the concentration of hydrogen ions in solution). Pure water is neutral with a pH of 7. Battery acid reads 2 or 3 on the pH scale, while baking soda might rate a 10 or 11.
Whether the coolant is acidic or alkaline makes a big difference. As long as it remains alkaline, corrosion is inhibited. But if it goes acidic, corrosion starts to eat away at the interior of the system. The corrosion-inhibiting additives in antifreeze are put there to keep the solution on the high side of the pH scale. The alkalinity of a typical antifreeze/water mixture will vary depending on the additives used and ratio of ingredients, but is usually somewhere between 8 and 11. The average for most antifreezes is around 10.5, but when diluted 50/50 with water and added to the cooling system the pH drops to the 8.5 to 9 range. Higher is not necessarily better, though, because some of the new long-life coolants have a pH of only 8.3. Staying power is what counts.
To ensure that the coolant remains alkaline for a reasonable length of time, there must be enough corrosion inhibitor to neutralize the acids formed from glycol degradation that occur over time. This neutralizing capability is called "reserve alkalinity," and it varies depending on the type and quantity of additives used in a particular brand of antifreeze.
Heat, dissolved oxygen, minerals in the water and corrosion inhibitor reactions at the metal surface gradually "use up" the corrosion inhibitors; once depleted, the coolant becomes acidic and corrosion accelerates. The trick to preventing internal corrosion, therefore, is to change the coolant before all the reserve alkalinity has been used up.
Under normal circumstances, conventional antifreeze usually contains enough reserve alkalinity and corrosion inhibitors to safely last two or three years. Replacing the antifreeze every two years or 30,000 miles for preventative maintenance, therefore, is usually recommended.
Periodic coolant changes are especially important with today's bi-metal engines and aluminum radiators because the different metals create a miniature battery cell that encourages electrolytic corrosion. Aluminum becomes the sacrificial anode, iron the cathode, with the coolant serving as the charge-carrying electrolyte. The higher the percentage of dissolved minerals and salts in the coolant, the better it conducts electricity and the faster the aluminum is eaten away. The corrosion inhibitors in quality antifreezes prevent this destructive electrolytic corrosion. But once the inhibitors are depleted, pinholes can form in radiators, cylinder heads can begin to weep coolant into the cylinders or crankcase, and water pumps and thermostat housings can start to leak.
Other problems can also accelerate the breakdown of the coolant. An exhaust leak into the cooling system through a cracked head or leaky gasket will quickly destroy reserve alkalinity because oxygen reacts with the additives in the antifreeze. If an engine has blown a head gasket, therefore, don't reuse the old antifreeze - replace it.
Using "hard" water can also shorten the life of the coolant. Tap water contains dissolved minerals that can react with and reduce the effectiveness of the corrosion inhibitors. Softened water contains fewer minerals but contains salts that can be just as bad. The best type of water to use, therefore, is pure distilled water. Distilled water is pH neutral, contains no acids, dissolved salts or minerals and will maximize the life of the coolant.



Antifreeze Analysis


There are a couple of ways to gauge the condition of the corrosion-inhibiting additives in the coolant. One is to use chemically treated test strips that change color to indicate the pH of the coolant. But all a litmus paper reading really tells you is whether or not the coolant is alkaline or acidic. It doesn't tell you how much reserve alkalinity or corrosion inhibitor the coolant has left. Nor does an alkaline pH reading always mean the coolant is still good. When aluminum starts to corrode, it can actually make the pH go back up!
Using pH to gauge the condition of the coolant is "iffy" at best because without knowing the specific additive package that was originally in the antifreeze, it's hard to tell what the pH reading actually means. So an alkaline reading may or may not mean the coolant is still good. A low pH reading (below 8 ), on the other hand, would generally indicate bad coolant and a need for a change. But be aware that Asian and the newer, long-life coolants can protect to lower pH (almost 7 ).
If it's been more than two or three years since your customer's coolantcoolant testers are available that measure the pH to determine its alkalinity. But test strips don't necessarily tell you how much life the coolant has left in it. But they can detect bad coolant. was last changed, however, chances are it may be nearing the end of its service life regardless of its pH reading. Electronic
You can also use an ordinary digital volt meter for the same purpose. With the engine off, touch the voltmeter positive test lead to the radiator or engine (making sure you get good metal-to-metal contact). Then open the radiator cap and insert the negative test lead into the coolant. A reading of up to 0.2 volts is considered acceptable and indicates the presence of reserve alkalinity in the coolant. If the coolant reads 0.3 to 0.6 volts, it is borderline and should be recycled or replaced. A reading of 0.7 volts or more would tell you the coolant is overdue for a change.
Internal corrosion in the cooling system can occur regardless of the condition of the coolant if voltage from various accessories (alternator, starter, ignition, etc.) flows through the coolant to ground rather than follows the intended ground path through the ground strap between the engine and chassis or the ground cable between the engine and battery. You can check for this condition by also using your DVOM. Use the same hookups as before to measure the voltage of the coolant, but this time while cranking the engine, then with the engine running and lights and heater on. If stray current is grounding through the coolant, you'll get a voltage reading. More than 0.15 volts can corrode aluminum, and 0.3 volts can be harmful to cast iron. Check, clean and tighten the ground straps and/or battery ground connection to eliminate the problem.


Coolant Additives


Can the corrosion inhibitors in the coolant be replenished or reconstituted by dumping a can of "rust inhibitor" or "coolant extender" in the radiator? Most vehicle manufacturers and antifreeze suppliers caution against the use of additives because it's a shotgun approach that runs a risk of upsetting the chemical balance in the system. Too much of a particular inhibitor can be just as bad as too little, causing sediment to precipitate out of solution and gum up the radiator. Short of running a laboratory chemical analysis on the coolant, there's no way to tell which inhibitors have been depleted, how much to add and whether or not the additives in the can will react adversely with those in the antifreeze.
The best advice is to replace or recycle the coolant according to the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations.


Import Additives


The additives used in European and Asian OEM antifreezes vary from those found in North American OEM and aftermarket antifreeze. European vehicle manufacturers specify an additive package that contains no phosphates and uses borates and low silicates. Their reason for doing so is because some areas of Europe have very hard water, which can react with phosphates to form calcium and magnesium sediments. The Japanese and Asian vehicle manufacturers, on the other hand, use phosphates but no borates and low or no silicates. They don't want borates in the system because they believe borates can corrode aluminum if the coolant is neglected for too long. Using an antifreeze that does not meet these requirements, therefore, may void the vehicle manufacturer's warranty.
Even so, topping off European or Asian cooling systems with a typical North American antifreeze (which contains silicates, phosphates and borates) should cause no problems. And once a vehicle is out of warranty, it should make no difference whatsoever what type of antifreeze is used in the cooling system, as long as it provides adequate corrosion protection.
There also are differences in the additive packages between various brands of aftermarket antifreeze. Some are better than others, so don't think for a moment that antifreeze is a "generic" product. There are differences. Some no-name, low-cost antifreeze products, for instance, can be straight ethylene glycol and contain no corrosion inhibitors or lubricants at all!


Coolant Recycling


Coolant recycling is growing in popularity because it eliminates most of the environmental concerns over coolant disposal, allows a valuable resource to be recovered and reused and combines flushing, recycling and refilling into one operation.
General Motors, Ford, Chrysler and most of the import manufacturers have endorsed coolant recycling provided the recycled coolant meets their quality specifications or the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) 3306 standard. General Motors, for example, says recycled coolant must meet their GM 1825-M standard. Most vehicle manufacturers list specific machines that have been tested and approved as meeting their requirements.
Coolant recycling machines use a variety of means to clean and replenish the coolant, including filtering out solids, chemically precipitating dissolved salts and other contaminants, de-ionization, reverse osmosis and distillation. Some processes are much more thorough than others, so it's important to make sure the equipment meets the required standards.
Once the coolant has been cleaned and decontaminated, corrosion inhibitors are added to it to replace the depleted additives. Some recycling equipment require separate additive packages for European, Asian and North American coolants, while others use the same basic additive package for all applications.
The economics of recycling coolant are debatable because the return on investment depends on the initial cost of the equipment, the cost of chemicals and other consumables (such as filters), periodic maintenance that may be required and the volume of work performed.



Alternative Coolants


Long-Life Coolants


The problem with conventional antifreeze is that silicate and phosphate corrosion inhibitors are consumed in performing their job. After a couple years of service, the chemicals that keep the coolant alkaline are mostly used up, leaving little or no protection against electrolytic attack on the metals in the engine and radiator. Changing the coolant for preventative maintenance every two to three years or 30,000 miles can minimize such risks, but getting people to do so isn't easy. In response to this neglect, "long-life" formula coolants have been introduced.
The new long-life antifreezes still contain ethylene glycol as their main ingredient, but use different additives to extend coolant life to five years or 100,000 miles. These types of products are ideal for customers who tend to neglect preventative maintenance, yet want maximum protection for their vehicle's cooling system.
The vehicle manufacturers have taken note of the new long-life coolants, and some have started using them as factory-fill coolants to reduce maintenance. Saturn was one of the first domestic vehicle manufacturers to do so, going to a "European" long-life borate additive package that extended the service interval to three years or 36,000 miles.
The biggest improvement, however, came with the '96 model year when General Motors began factory filling all their cars and light trucks with "Dex-Cool" made by Texaco and marketed under the Havoline "Extended Life" brand name.
Dex-Cool has a service life of five years or 100,000 miles and is dyed orange so it can be easily distinguished from ordinary green antifreeze. It is a conventional ethylene glycol antifreeze but contains a unique corrosion inhibiting chemistry that uses carboxylate organic acids instead of the silicates, phosphates or borates.
GM says getting rid of traditional silicates helps to extend the life of the water pump. They believe that the microscopic particles of silicate in conventional antifreeze have an abrasive effect on water pump shaft seals that contribute to seal wear and leakage over time. The protective coating that's formed by Dex-Cool's organic acids on metal surfaces in the cooling system is also thinner than that formed by silicates, which initially improves heat transfer and cooling efficiency slightly.
GM says Dex-Cool should not be intermixed with ordinary antifreeze because doing so reduces the service life of the coolant. What's more, if ordinary antifreeze is used to top off a new vehicle with less than 3,000 miles on it, the additives in the conventional coolant can interfere with Dex-Cool's ability to form a protective layer on aluminum surfaces. This can allow the unprotected metal to corrode. So if the coolant has been contaminated, it should be completely drained or flushed and refilled with Dex-Cool. Unfortunately, it isn't easy to tell if Dex-Cool has been "contaminated" by ordinary antifreeze because the orange dye in Dex-Cool tends to mask the green dye in regular antifreeze. As much as 25 percent ordinary antifreeze can be added to the system without causing any noticeable change in the color of the coolant.
Once a vehicle has more than 3,000 miles on it, contamination with ordinary coolant should cause no short-term corrosion problems, but the long-term effectiveness of Dex-Cool will be reduced to that of ordinary antifreeze (two years or 30,000 miles). Bottom line: If a customer with a '96 or '97 GM product needs antifreeze, be sure to use Dex-Cool.
Note: To prevent intermixing of Dex-Cool with conventional antifreeze, it's important that all old antifreeze is completely drained from the cooling system. This requires flushing the system or using a flush and fill machine to exchange coolants.


The "Other" Antifreeze


Another type of antifreeze that's appeared in recent years is one containing propylene glycol (PG) rather than ethylene glycol (EG). Safe Brands/Arco Chemical markets a PG-based antifreeze under the "Sierra" brand name and Prestone under the "Low Tox" name as a safer, less toxic coolant. PG-based antifreeze is not safe to drink, but is significantly less toxic than EG. It also has an unpleasant taste, which reduces the risk of accidental poisoning of pets and small children.
In terms of freezing and boiling protection, PG performs about the same as EG. PG provides freezing protection down to minus 26 degrees in a 50/50 mixture, and boilover protection to 257 degrees (these are a few degrees less on both counts than EG, but can be offset by simply increasing the percentage of PG in the coolant). A 60/40 mixture of PG and water will protect down to minus 54 degrees F.
Though some auto makers initially said they did not approve of using PG antifreeze in their vehicles, GM said it does approve PG as an acceptable replacement coolant.
If you're adding PG to a customer's vehicle, you must first remove all ethylene glycol from the cooling system by flushing or completely draining all the old coolant. PG should not be mixed with EG because the freezing and boiling points are different, making it impossible to determine accurately how much freezing/boiling protection is in the coolant. An ordinary antifreeze tester cannot measure the concentration of PG in the coolant, so you need a second hydrometer, test strip or refractometer that's specially calibrated to read PG.

_________________
Germán Grüner
Disco 300TDI´98
Visite s. "Solidarias", no se la pierda! http://landroverclub.com.ar/viewforum.php?f=23
Imagen

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 08 Ago 2007, 21:49
Mensajes: 831
Ubicación: Bariloche

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 14:55 
Arriba  
Gracias German por el articulo. Confirmaría lo que intuitivamente pensaba al respecto de los problemas de temperatura que aparecen con los años de uso: que el anticongelante/ refrigerante quizas en algun momento se siguio utilizando ya vencido, o que las proporciones utilizadas no fueron las correctas, o no se uso agua desmineralizada en la mezcla, o directamente no se utilizo el producto adecuado para el motor especifico... En fin, cualquiera de estas causas sumaria al mal funcionamiento, a la corrosion y al taponamiento progresivo de los elementos... Porque quizas no sea solo el radiador lo que se va tapando...

Puedo comentar que esta ultima vez que vaciaron el circuito, el liquido que salio arriba, al desconectar las mangueras superiores del termostato, parecia en perfecto estado, verde transparente sin nada de sedimento, en cambio el liquido que salio por las mangueras inferiores y del motor, el mecanico comento que salio con sedimento de oxido. Este ultimo recambio tenia poco mas de 1 año de uso, asi que vencido no estaba, pero cuantas veces los dueños anteriores cuidaron esto, no se.

¿Cual seria el anticongelante recomendado para el 300 tdi que se consigue por estas tierras?

Saludos!
Silvia

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 19 Ago 2007, 18:37
Mensajes: 5353
Ubicación: La Plata - Pcia. Bs. As.

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 15:02 
Arriba  
Yo estoy utilizando el Valvoline, es de color rojo o rosado, con muy buen resultado.

_________________
Pedro
Solo una cosa vuelve a un sueño imposible: El Miedo a fracasar

Defe Tdi 96 (el Tropezón) casi un "Disc-fender"
Ex Disco Tdi '98 (la Verde)
Ex Defe Tdi '99
Ex Disco Tdi '97
Ex Disco Tdi '94

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 08 Ago 2007, 21:49
Mensajes: 831
Ubicación: Bariloche

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 15:16 
Arriba  
Gracias Pedro. ¿encontras oxido entre los recambios de anticongelante con el Valvoline?

Me llamo mucho la atencion esta ultima vez que cambiaron el refrigerante y que saliera oxido... Me quede con la duda monumental si al cambiarlo por primera vez, al poco tiempo de comprar la Defe, el mecanico que lo hizo, no vacio el circuito por completo,y entonces este oxido que salio ahora en el segundo cambio seria viejo, o si la proporcion utilizada en el primer cambio fue insuficiente (3 lts de anticongelante)... o que. :? Ahora insisti poner el anticongelante al 50%.

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 07 Ago 2007, 14:04
Mensajes: 3531
Ubicación: Tigre

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 15:29 
Arriba  
Pedro, qué sería "buen resultado"?
saludos, max

 Perfil  

Desconectado
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 03 Sep 2007, 11:18
Mensajes: 1480
Ubicación: San Isidro

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 16:16 
Arriba  
Es largo, pero esta bueno.....

Saludos



Refrigeración

-----------------

Texto base por Nacho Areces

-----------------

INTRODUCCIÓN

Los fabricantes de los motores han aumentado la temperatura de funcionamiento para mejorar el rendimiento térmico y por tanto la eficacia. Por ende, el correcto mantenimiento del sistema de refrigeración se convierte en una tarea primordial para el correcto funcionamiento del motor. El recalentamiento, el enfriamiento excesivo, las picaduras, la erosión por cavitación, las culatas rajadas, el bloqueo de los segmentos y el taponamiento del radiador son los síntomas de problemas en el sistema de refrigeración.

La calidad del refrigerante es tan importante como la del combustible o la del aceite lubricante. El refrigerante influye mucho en la vida útil de un motor.

El siguiente texto aborda los siguientes apartados relacionados con el refrigerante: su composición, como se identifica su contaminación y algunas medidas preventivas que se pueden tomar para evitar las averías relacionadas con el refrigerante.


FUNCIONAMIENTO DEL SISTEMA DE ENFRIAMIENTO

La compresión de cómo funciona un sistema de refrigeración nos va a ayudar a descubrir sus averías y fallos y a reducir los costes de mantenimiento.

Durante el funcionamiento, todos los motores de combustión interna generan calor. Este calor es producido por la combustión del combustible en el interior del motor. La temperatura de combustión ronda los 1900 ºC (aproximadamente). Sin embargo, sólo un 33% (Aprox.) del calor total se convierte en potencia útil para el cigüeñal. Un 30% se pierde por los gases de escape. Mientras que un 7% se disipa por la superficie del motor. El otro 30% restante pasa al sistema de enfriamiento.

El sistema de enfriamiento, además de disipar el calor de la combustión, en muchos casos también disipa el calor proveniente de otras fuentes como pueden ser:

· Enfriadores de aceite de la transmisión.
· Enfriadores de aceite hidráulico.
· Enfriadores de aceite del motor.
· Posenfriadores (intercoolers).
· Carcasas y protectores de turbocompresores, refrigerados por agua.
· Enfriadores de aceite de convertidores de par de las transmisiones.

En el automóvil, no es habitual que se den todos los casos, lo más común es que el sistema de refrigeración también enfríe el intercooler y el radiador de aceite del motor y en raras ocasiones la refrigeración del turbo compresor.

El sistema de enfriamiento tiene como objetivo evacuar el calor suficiente para mantener el motor funcionando a la temperatura de diseño. Esta función, es sumamente importante durante el funcionamiento de un motor de combustión interna.

Hay muchos tipos diferentes de sistemas de enfriamiento. La mayoría de ellos disipan el calor mediante el uso de un radiador. Otros, como los empleados en los barcos, mediante el uso de un enfriador de quilla, (conjunto de tubos de enfriamiento para sacar el calor). En la mayoría de los sistemas de enfriamiento, sin embargo, los componentes básicos son:

· Radiador.
· Ventilador.
· Refrigerante.
· Bomba de agua.
· Enfriador de aceite del motor.
· Regulador de temperatura del agua (termostato).

Un sistema de enfriamiento típico funciona de la siguiente manera: el refrigerante se dirige hacia todos los elementos del motor y a través de otros componentes auxiliares (transmisiones, refrigeradores de aceite hidráulico...) para absorber el calor y luego, una vez caliente, es llevado al radiador donde se enfría.

El flujo del refrigerante comienza en la bomba del agua y pasa después al motor y a otros componentes. Primero, el refrigerante fluye por el enfriador de aceite del motor y, luego, se dirige al bloque motor. Después pasa por el bloque motor a la culata de cilindros y, después, al radiador. Finalmente, el refrigerante completa su ciclo cuando alcanza la bomba del agua. Donde comienza un ciclo nuevo.

Durante el funcionamiento normal, el ventilador expulsa o aspira (dependiendo si esta colocado delante o detrás del radiador) el aire a través de las aletas del radiador y alrededor de los tubos. Cuando el motor está frío, los reguladores de temperatura (termostatos) impiden el paso de refrigerante al radiador. Poco a poco va aumentando la temperatura de refrigerante, el termostato comienza poco a poco a abrirse y permite el paso del líquido refrigerante al radiador. Cuando el refrigerante fluye por el radiador, el movimiento del aire a través de los tubos y aletas reduce la temperatura del refrigerante.

Los sistemas de enfriamiento han sido diseñados para mantener el motor en funcionamiento dentro de una gama deseada de temperaturas. La temperatura del refrigerante debe de permanecer alta para permitir que el motor funcione eficazmente. Sin embargo la temperatura debe de ser lo suficientemente baja para evitar que hierva el refrigerante.

El sistema de enfriamiento regula la temperatura transmitiendo el calor del motor al refrigerante y después, al aire ambiente (o una fuente de agua externa, motores marinos o fijos). La rapidez con que el sistema transfiere calor del refrigerante al aire afecta directamente a la temperatura del sistema. Este régimen de transferencia de calor del radiador depende de diversos factores.

Uno de los factores importantes en la transferencia de calor es la diferencia entre la temperatura del refrigerante dentro del radiador y la del ambiente. Cuando aumenta la diferencia entre la temperatura del refrigerante y la del ambiente, aumenta también el régimen de transferencia de calor. Cuando disminuye esta diferencia en temperatura, disminuye también el régimen de transferencia de calor.

Si el refrigerante comienza a hervir o producir vapor, se descarga por la válvula de alivio de presión del radiador. Esto baja el nivel de refrigerante y conduce al recalentamiento del motor. Una vez que el radiador comienza a recalentarse, el funcionamiento continuado sólo empeora la situación.

La temperatura a la cual el refrigerante hierve depende de tres factores:

1. La presión a la cual funciona el sistema de enfriamiento. (En la mayoría de los casos determinada por la válvula de alivio que posee el tapón del radiador, un tapón en malas condiciones puede hacer que el líquido hierva a una temperatura más baja que la de diseño).
2. La altitud a la cual funciona el sistema de enfriamiento.
3. La cantidad y el tipo de anticongelante en la mezcla de líquido refrigerante.

El punto de ebullición es más alto a niveles de presión más altos. Por lo tanto, la mayoría de los sistemas de enfriamiento han sido diseñados para funcionar bajo presión. La presión máxima del sistema la controla ya sea una válvula en la tapa del radiador o la válvula de alivio de presión.

Para sistemas sin tapa de presión, el punto de ebullición es más bajo a altitudes más altas (ya que la presión disminuye con la altura, si subimos a una montaña la presión baja). Por ejemplo, a 1800 metros (6000 pies) por encima del nivel del mar, el agua hierve a 93ºC. Pero a 3700 metros (120000 pies), hierve a sólo 88ºC.

En función del tipo de anticongelante y la cantidad añadida al agua, también se modifica su temperatura de ebullición. El punto de ebullición es más alto con concentraciones más altas de anticongelante de Glicol etilénico. Sin embargo el Glicol etilénico es menos eficaz en la transferencia de calor que el agua. A causa de estos efectos sobre el punto de ebullición y sobre la eficacia de transferencia de calor, es extremadamente importante tener la concentración apropiada de glicol etilénico.


PROPIEDADES DEL REFRIGERANTE

Por lo general, una mezcla de refrigerante consta de agua mezclada con anticongelante. El tipo de refrigerante que se selecciona influye directamente en la eficacia y la duración del sistema de enfriamiento y del motor.

Se usa agua en la mezcla de refrigerante porque es el agente de transferencia de calor más eficiente, mejor conocido y más accesible en todo el mundo. Sin embargo, cada fuente de agua tiene diferentes niveles de contaminantes. A una temperatura elevada, como la que se origina en los modernos motores, estos contaminantes forman ácidos o escamilla que puede reducir la vida útil del sistema de enfriamiento.

Se puede usar agua en la mezcla de refrigerante si los niveles de contaminantes no son excesivos y si se realiza el mantenimiento apropiado del sistema de enfriamiento. El agua debe cumplir con los niveles establecidos en cuanto a:

· Contenido de cloruro.
· Contenido de sulfatos.
· Dureza total.
· Cantidad total de sólidos.
· Nivel de pH.

Las características del agua pueden variar de un sitio a otro. Por ejemplo, un alto contenido de cloruros se encuentra, comúnmente, en las zonas costeras donde se emplean plantas de desalinación. Es posible que el contenido en cloruros sea de 90 ppm (partes por millón) en una zona determinada y de hasta 1200 ppm a una distanciad de tan sólo 80 Km. Los altos contenidos en sulfatos, se encuentran por lo general en zonas cerca de minas de carbón. Es necesario tratar químicamente cualquier fuente de agua que contenga altos niveles de cloruros, sulfatos o sólidos totalmente disueltos.

En el caso de motores de automoción, debido al pequeño volumen de refrigerante que utiliza en su sistema de refrigeración, es mucho más aconsejable el empleo de agua destilada (pura, como la empleada en baterías) que tiene un bajo coste y no posee ninguno de los inconvenientes anteriormente citados.

NUNCA UTILICE SOLO AGUA COMO REFRIGERANTE. Se requiere una mezcla de agua y aditivos refrigerantes suplementarios, porque el agua es CORROSIVA a las temperaturas de funcionamiento del motor.

Si la concentración del aditivo es demasiado alta, se pueden formar sales insolubles que pueden producir desgaste en las superficies de los sellos de la bomba del agua. Un exceso de aditivo refrigerante o de anticongelante puede dañar también el motor.

Los motores con mayor contenido de aluminio requieren silicatos para proteger las superficies de aluminio. El aditivo refrigerante utilizado en estos motores, debe de someterse a las siguientes pruebas.

ASTM D1384 - Prueba de corrosión de vidrio.
ASTM D2809 - Erosión por cavitación del aluminio.
ASTM D4340 – Corrosión de superficie caliente del aluminio.

Además hay que controlar las picaduras y la erosión por cavitación del bloque y de la camisa del cilindro de hierro fundido. Con el tiempo, se reduce la concentración de aditivos refrigerantes. Esto ocurre porque los aditivos se desintegran al cubrir las superficies metálicas y al neutralizar continuamente los ácidos producidos en el sistema. Por lo tanto para mantener una protección continua del sistema, es necesario remplazar el líquido refrigerante aproximadamente cada 2 años o 40.000 Km. (dependerá del las instrucciones del fabricante del motor). En motores industriales se recomienda añadir 0.5 litros de aditivo cada 75 litros de refrigerante en intervalos de 250 h (de 16.000 Km. a 19.000 Km.)

No debe nunca de usarse aceite soluble como aditivo refrigerante, porque en la mayoría de los casos se dañará las mangueras del radiador y ciertos sellos del motor. Además, este aceite no lubrica los cojinetes de las bombas ni protege los componentes del motor contra daños de erosión por cavitación.

Uno de los propósitos del anticongelante es proteger el refrigerante del motor contra el congelamiento. El agente utilizado con más frecuencia como anticongelante es el glicol etilénico. Las concentraciones relativas de glicol etilénico y agua son sumamente importantes para determinar la cantidad de protección anticongelante de una mezcla determinada.

Además, el anticongelante eleva el punto de ebullición del agua e impide la cavitación de la bomba del agua.

Si se aumenta la concentración de glicol etilénico por encima del 70% ya no se obtiene una reducción del punto de congelación. Luego no es recomendable sobrepasar una concentración de glicol etilénico por encima del 60%.

Desde el principio de los años 70, cuando se inició el uso de glicol etilénico, se agregaban inhibidores para ayudar a evitar la corrosión de los componentes del motor. Este tipo de refrigerantes tuvo mucho éxito hasta finales de los años 70 y principio de los 80. Durante ese período, la industria automotriz comenzó a lanzar diversos programas de reducción de peso y de costos que dejaron expuestos al sistema de enfriamiento algunos elementos importantes, tales como bloques y culatas. Debido a este cambio del material de los componentes, la industria desarrolló un anticongelante para proteger los dispositivos de aluminio. Este tipo de refrigerantes no puede mezclarse con aditivos suplementarios, porque ya posee una concentración de sólidos químicos muy elevada, y al añadirle nuevos aditivos, se produce precipitados sólidos. Este exceso de concentración puede producir los siguientes problemas en los sistemas de enfriamiento:

· Transferencia de calor reducida, resultado de depósitos y precipitados de compuestos químicos y de gel de sílice.
· Fugas prematuras por los sellos de las bombas de agua, producidas por precipitados y depósitos de compuestos químicos en la superficie del sello.

A menudo, se atribuyen estos problemas a los silicatos y al gel de sílice, pero el problema principal es el exceso de concentración – no sólo de silicatos sino también de todos los aditivos químicos utilizados como inhibidores. Para corregir este problema, hay que reducir la cantidad de todos los aditivos en el sistema de enfriamiento. Para evitar problemas seguir las recomendaciones siguientes:

· Siga las recomendaciones del fabricante respecto al empelo de inhibidores suplementarios. Nunca use juntos inhibidores líquidos y sólidos.
· No mezcle aditivos anticorrosivos dentro de un sistema de enfriamiento; seleccione un solo aditivo y úselo exclusivamente.
· Use sólo la cantidad de anticongelante necesaria para cumplir con los requisitos de protección contra el frío necesarios. Nunca utilice más del 60% por volumen.
· Nunca use un anticongelante sin diluir para llenar un sistema. Mezcle de antemano el anticongelante con el agua.
· Use agua destilada o en su defecto, agua que cumpla por lo menos con la calidad mínima aceptable indicada en la tabla de la fig. 5.

Existen numerosos refrigerantes especialmente diseñados para los modernos motores, se debe de elegir un refrigerante con las siguientes especificaciones:

· Anticongelante de base glicol etilénico, el cual protege contra el congelamiento.
· Que contenga agentes antiespumantes.
· Un nivel de protección adecuado contra la corrosión de los metales.
· No contenga un exceso de de compuestos químicos que puedan precipitar y formar depósitos dañinos.
· Protección contra picaduras de las camisas de cilindro y del bloque motor.

Glicol propilénico

Debido a la escasez de glicol etilénico y el precio aumentando del mismo, se puede usar en su lugar, el glicol propilénico según las condiciones. Con una mezcla de 50/50 con agua, tanto el glicol propilénico como el glicol etilénico tienen propiedades de fluido muy similares con respecto a la transferencia del calor, protección anticongelante, control de corrosión y compatibilidad de los sellos.

Si se selecciona glicol propilénico para el sistema de enfriamiento, se recomienda lo siguiente:

1. Úselo de la misma manera que utilizaría anticongelantes derivados de glicol etilénico.
2. No lo use en concentraciones mayores que una mezcla de 50% de glicol propilénico y 50% de agua a causa de la menor conductividad del glicol propilénico puro.
3. Use inhibidor de corrosión suplementario para proteger los componentes del sistema de enfriamiento.
4. Hay que medir la protección anticongelante del glicol propilénico usando un medidor de concentración específico. No vale el medidor de concentración de glicol etilénico.
5. Aunque se pueda mezclar el glicol etilénico con el propilénico, es mejor mantener el sistema con un solo fluido para evaluar las propiedades del fluido.

AVERÍAS RELACIONADAS CON EL SISTEMA DE REFRIGERACIÓN

Si no se selecciona el refrigerante adecuado y no se lo mantiene minuciosamente, ciertos efectos funcionales pueden causar problemas en el sistema de enfriamiento. Hay que emplear refrigerantes o bien mezclas de los mismos, de tal manera que se reduzcan el riesgo de que se produzcan los siguientes problemas:

· Erosión por cavitación y picaduras
· Herrumbre
· Relación inapropiada de acidez/alcalinidad
· Corrosión galvaniza y electrolítica
· Escamilla y depósitos, aeración

El uso de agua aceptable y de los aditivos apropiados evita estos efectos funcionales.

La corrosión es una acción química o electroquímica que con el tiempo, desgasta las superficies metálicas de un sistema de enfriamiento. En algunos casos, la corrosión puede hasta destruir el motor. Todos los componentes del sistema de enfriamiento requieren protección contra la corrosión. Los aditivos cubren estas superficies y neutralizan la contaminación que se produce en el refrigerante.


Entre los tipos de corrosión figuran:

· Corrosión por cavitación y picaduras
· Herrumbre

· Relación inapropiada de acidez/alcalinidad
· Corrosión galvánica y electrolítica
· Formación de escamilla y depósitos
· Aeración


Erosión por Cavitación y Picaduras

El flujo de electricidad en un punto determinado causa picaduras. Las picaduras dañan los componentes más que ningún otro tipo de corrosión.

Cuando las picaduras se van ahondando durante un periodo prolongado, no hay ninguna manera práctica de detenerlas antes de que den lugar a perforaciones. Como un solo amperio de electricidad que fluye durante treinta horas puede eliminar una onza de hierro, el flujo de electricidad que se centra en un área pequeña es muy destructivo. Por esta razón, la prevención es la mejor práctica.

La erosión es una combinación de acción mecánica y química o electroquímica que produce corrosión. La cavitación es un tipo particular de corrosión por erosión y es, frecuentemente, la causa de picaduras en las paredes de los cilindros.

La cavitación de la pared del cilindro se produce cuando burbujas de aire en la superficie de la misma le sacan su película protectora de óxido. Cuando explota la mezcla de combustible en la cámara de combustión, la pared del cilindro se flexiona y vibra, lo cual produce burbujas de aire en el refrigerante. La concentración de burbujas aumenta cuando la presión está baja en el sistema de enfriamiento o cuando este tiene fugas. Además al aumentar las vibraciones, aumenta también la cantidad de burbujas de aire en el refrigerante.

Cuando el motor funciona en frío, se aumentan las vibraciones a causa del mayor espacio libre entre pistón y cilindro (los materiales aún no se han dilatado y las holguras son mayores). Las vibraciones aumentan también cuando el motor se sobrecarga.

Estas burbujas se producen en la superficie exterior de la pared del cilindro (perpendicular respecto al pasador de la articulación) y luego explotan hacia dentro, es decir implotan. Cuando las burbujas de aire siguen experimentando implosiones, se libera suficiente energía como para atacar físicamente la pared del cilindro y sacar la película de óxido, lo cual produce corrosión y picaduras con gran rapidez.

Con el tiempo, una picadura se puede volver lo suficiente profunda como para perforar la pared del cilindro y permitir fugas de refrigerante dentro del mismo. Estas fugas contaminan el aceite lubricante.

Los aditivos refrigerantes suplementarios cubren las superficies metálicas y controlan la erosión por cavitación y las picaduras. Desafortunadamente, partículas pequeñas o escamillas de hierro a menudo impiden que el aditivo haga contacto con las superficies metálicas. Si esta condición persiste, se pueden producir picaduras. Para evitar picaduras mantenga limpio el sistema de enfriamiento y cambie el refrigerante en los periodos recomendados por el fabricante. No obstante si no se agregan aditivos o se añaden en cantidades inapropiadas, se acrecienta la producción de picaduras y la erosión por cavitación. Con el tiempo, el refrigerante puede penetrar en la pared del cilindro y causar daños mayores al motor.

Herrumbre

La herrumbre es el resultado de la oxidación dentro del sistema de enfriamiento. El calor y el aire húmedo aceleran este proceso. La herrumbre deja depósitos de escamilla que pueden obstruir el sistema de enfriamiento, lo cual causa desgaste acelerado y reduce la eficacia de la transferencia de calor.

Relación Inapropiada de Acidez/Alcalinidad

El contenido de acidez y alcalinidad de una mezcla de refrigerante se mide según su nivel de pH. El nivel pH, que puede variar entre 1 y 14, indica el grado de acidez o de alcalinidad y el grado de corrosividad del refrigerante. Para lograr los mejores resultados, el nivel de pH del sistema debe mantenerse entre 8,5 y 10,5. Cuando el nivel de pH supera 11,0 el nivel de refrigerante ataca al aluminio y al cobre, o los materiales no ferrosos. Cuando el nivel es inferior a 7,0 el refrigerante se torna ácido y daña los materiales ferrosos. Cuando el nivel es inferior a 7,0 o superior a 11,0 la mezcla de refrigerante no es adecuada. La menor corrosión ocurre entre 8,5 y 10,0.
La temperatura afecta al nivel pH. A temperaturas mayores, el pH es, por lo general, menor.

Los aditivos de los refrigerantes utilizados en la mezcla del refrigerante deben de tener agentes amortiguadores para mantener el nivel de pH y neutralizar los ácidos producidos por los gases de escape del cárter.

Corrosión Galvánica y Electrolítica

Las corrientes eléctricas que fluyen por el refrigerante entre dos metales diferentes causan la corrosión galvánica. El refrigerante sirve de conductor eléctrico entre los metales. Una fuerza electromotriz o un voltaje potencial que existe entre los dos metales diferentes permiten el flujo de electricidad. La corrosión galvánica ocurre en el metal la menor resistencia.

En aplicaciones marinas, donde el agua de mar tiene una gran capacidad de conducción, se colocan materiales de desgaste (varillas) en los pasajes de agua de mar que absorben el flujo de electricidad. Se emplea como material de sacrificio el magnesio o el zinc. Hay que inspeccionar las varillas regularmente y reemplazarlas cuando estén desgastadas.

Si se produjera corrosión galvánica en aplicaciones como camiones u otras que no sean marinas, inmediatamente drene, enjuague y vuelva a llenar la mezcla refrigerante. Hay que determinar el origen del voltaje para evitar la corrosión continua de los componentes.

La corrosión puede ocurrir también cuando la electricidad que pasa por el refrigerante proviene de una fuente externa. Para evitar una corrosión electrolítica, se debe de diseñar los sistemas eléctricos de manera que no se imponga ningún potencial eléctrico sobre los componentes del sistema de enfriamiento. Cualquiera que sea la calidad de la mezcla del refrigerante, la presencia de un potencial eléctrico puede dañar, por corrosión electrolítica, los materiales del sistema de enfriamiento. Se debe de verificar las conexiones a masa con un voltohmiómetro. Típicamente, la resistencia medida entre un componente eléctrico en el motor y el negativo de la batería debe de ser menos de 0,3 ohmios. Todas las conexiones a masa deben de ser firmes y estar libres de corrosión.

Las piezas de aluminio son susceptibles a la corrosión electrolítica. El aluminio requiere sólo aproximadamente la mitad del potencial eléctrico que el hierro para producir el mismo efecto dañino. Con los componentes de aluminio de los motores más nuevos, hay que tomar aún más cuidado para asegurar una conexión a masa apropiada para evitar diferencias de potencial eléctrico.

Es extremadamente difícil de localizar estos tipos de corrosión. Hay que hallar la fuente de la corriente eléctrica. Muchos problemas son resultado de una conexión a masa inadecuada de los componentes eléctricos o conexiones corroídas en los cables de conexión a masa.

Escamilla y Depósitos

Las características principales del agua – entre las que figura el nivel de pH, la dureza del calcio y del magnesio, la dureza total y la temperatura – determinan la formación de depósitos y de escamilla. El uso de refrigerantes con aditivos es un factor importante en la formación de escamilla y de depósitos. A continuación se indican los tipos de escamilla que se encuentran frecuentemente en el sistema de enfriamiento:

· Carbonato de calcio
· Sulfato de calcio
· Hierro
· Cobre
· Sílice
· Plomo

La escamilla y los depósitos producen daños en el sistema de enfriamiento porque actúan como aisladores y barreras contra la transferencia de calor. Por lo tanto, los depósitos y la escamilla reducen la eficacia del sistema de enfriamiento. Apenas 1,6 mm de escamilla tienen la misma capacidad aislante que aproximadamente 100 mm de hierro fundido. Este depósito de delgado de escamilla puede reducir la transferencia de calor en un 40%. En muchos casos, provoca serias averías del motor.

Utilizando un refrigerante adecuado o en su defecto un agua pretratada con aditivos, ayuda a mantener el motor libre de escamilla y de depósitos.

Fugas de aire en el sistema de enfriamiento a menudo resultan en la producción de espuma en el refrigerante. La espuma conduce a picaduras, particularmente alrededor de rodetes de bombas de agua. Las picaduras y la corrosión aumentan notablemente cuando entran en el sistema de enfriamiento gases de escape, introduciendo burbujas y espuma.

Para evitar estos problemas, se debe agregar aditivos supresores de espuma a la mezcla de refrigerante. Los buenos refrigerantes poseen aditivos con agentes antiespumantes que impiden la formación de burbujas de aire.

AVERÍAS MECÁNICAS RELACIONADAS CON EL REFRIGERANTE

Debido a la función fundamental que tiene el sistema de enfriamiento en regular la temperatura, problemas relacionados con el refrigerante, tales como la corrosión o la aeración, pueden conducir a la avería del motor. Las temperaturas excesivamente altas o excesivamente bajas conducen a una avería. A menudo, el recalentamiento produce grietas en las culatas y en los bloques de motor y atascamiento de los pistones. Las temperaturas de operación excesivamente bajas conducen a otros problemas, tales como la formación de sedimento y la acumulación de carbón.


El sobrecalentamiento puede provenir de muchas causas posibles:

· Bajo nivel de refrigerante
· Radiador taponado
· Mangueras rotas o con fugas de refrigerante
· Correas de ventilador flojas
· Carga excesiva en el motor
· Fallos en el regulador de temperatura del agua o de la bomba del agua
· Restricción del flujo de aire de admisión o del escape
· Motor que funciona sin regulador de temperatura
· Sistema de enfriamiento (intercambiador de calor, enfriador o radiador) defectuoso o demasiado pequeño.

Muchas de las causas citadas están relacionadas con el refrigerante. Algunos ejemplos típicos de averías relacionadas con el refrigerante son: culatas relajadas o deformadas, bloques de motor dañados, pistones atascados y bajas temperaturas de operación.

Culatas Rajadas o Deformadas

Cuando se calienta el motor, se aumenta los esfuerzos de tensión en la culata, lo cual puede terminar con una culata rajada o deformada.

El bloque motor es un lugar potencialmente vulnerable. La erosión por cavitación y las picaduras excesivas del pasaje de agua alrededor del cilindro pueden producir agujeros, en la pared del cilindro. A menudo, las picaduras y la erosión por cavitación son resultado de un mantenimiento inapropiado del sistema de enfriamiento y se puede evitar si se cambia el refrigerante en los intervalos prefijados por el fabricante.

Atascamiento de los Pistones

Otro resultado común del recalentamiento son los pistones dañados. Normalmente, alguno de los pistones sufren daños por atascamiento (raspado), aunque los faldones de los pistones restantes se vean pulidos o normales. Por lo general, los daños más severos se producen en los pistones de los cilindros más alejados de la bomba del agua, lugar en el que la temperatura del refrigerante es más alta.

En los motores diesel, de inyección directa, la mayoría de los daños por atascamiento causados por enfriamiento inadecuado de los cilindros comienzan, comúnmente, en el faldón del pistón. En cambio, en motores con sistemas de precombustión, el atascamiento frecuentemente comienza en el resalto superior.

Bajas Temperaturas de Funcionamiento

El exceso de enfriamiento puede dañar un motor al igual que el recalentamiento. Una temperatura de funcionamiento adecuada influye de forma positiva en la duración del motor. El motor debe de alcanzar la temperatura de funcionamiento de diseño para evitar fallos y averías.

El funcionamiento continuo de un motor a bajas temperaturas crea la formación de sedimentos en el cárter. Los sedimentos pueden causar el bloqueo de las válvulas, de los pistones y de los segmentos. Además al usar combustibles con contenido en azufre, el ácido sulfúrico puede producirse más fácilmente y acelerar la corrosión.

Las bajas temperaturas de funcionamiento, pueden conducir también a la acumulación de carbón, la cual es resultado de un exceso de lubricación o de operación del motor en frío.

Una temperatura de servicio adecuada, reduce la formación de depósitos de carbón en las válvulas.

Los motores actuales están equipados con termostatos para regular la temperatura. Si es necesario cambiar el termostato, deberá de colocarse uno con las mismas especificaciones técnicas que el sustituido. Nunca permitir que un motor funcione durante largo tiempo con el termostato estropeado o quitado, de otra manera, se producirán averías y fallos en numerosos componentes del motor.

Mantenimiento Periódico
Limpiador de Sistemas de Enfriamiento

El sistema de enfriamiento debe de estar libre de herrumbre, escamilla y otros depósitos. La limpieza preventiva, evita el uso posterior de costosos procesos de limpieza especial en un sistema de enfriamiento muy sucio y descuidado.

Los limpiadores de sistema de enfriamiento:

· Disuelven y reducen la formación de depósitos de minerales, la corrosión y el sedimento y contaminación ligera del aceite.
· Limpian el motor que esté en buen estado.
· Reducen el tiempo inactivo del motor y los costes de limpieza.
· Evitan las reparaciones costosas de picaduras y otros problemas internos causados por el mantenimiento inadecuado del sistema de enfriamiento.
· Deben de poder usarse con anticongelantes derivados de glicol.

La mayor parte de los limpiadores han sido diseñados para sacar la escamilla y la corrosión dañina sin acortar el tiempo activo del motor. Los limpiadores suaves no se deben usar en sistemas que se hayan descuidado o que tengan mucha escamilla. Tales sistemas requieren el uso de un solvente comercial más potente.

El mantenimiento periódico es necesario para que el sistema de enfriamiento funcione eficazmente. Los procedimientos de mantenimiento que se indican a continuación prolongan la duración tanto del sistema de enfriamiento como del motor.

Estas son recomendaciones generales. Es necesario consultar un manual del motor para enterarse de los requisitos específicos.

LLENADO INICIAL

1. Use el anticongelante y el agua apropiado.
2. Antes de llenar el sistema de enfriamiento, cierre todos los sistemas de drenaje.
3. Siempre mezcle de antemano el agua, el aditivo refrigerante suplementario y el anticongelante antes de agregar la mezcla al sistema de enfriamiento.
4. No llene el sistema de enfriamiento a una velocidad excesiva (máximo 19 litros/minutos). Esto impide la formación de burbujas de aire, las cuales pueden provocar un llenado parcial y causar vapor perjudicial.
5. Después de llenar el sistema de enfriamiento, haga funcionar el motor durante varios minutos con la tapa del radiador sacada. Luego coloque la tapa y haga funcionar el motor a baja velocidad en vacío hasta que se caliente el refrigerante.
6. Inspeccione el nivel de refrigerante en el tanque de expansión. Agregue refrigerante, de ser necesario, y coloque la tapa del radiador. Examine todos los componentes del sistema de enfriamiento para ver si hay fugas. Si no hay fugas, el motor estará listo para trabajar.

COMPROBACIÓN DIARIA O CADA 10 HORAS

1. Inspeccione el nivel del refrigerante en el tanque superior.
2. Saque cualquier basura o tierra de la superficie exterior del radiador (y entre los módulos de los radiadores de módulos en zigzag)

INTERVALOS DE 50 HORAS

1. Dé servicio también a todos los componentes cuyos intervalos de mantenimiento sean menores de 50 horas.
2. Inspeccionar las varillas de zinc o de magnesio si las tiene.

COMPROBACIÓN MENSUAL O CADA 250 HORAS

1. Dé servicio a todos los componentes cuyos intervalos de mantenimiento sean menores de 250 horas.
2. Inspeccione el estado y la tensión de todas las correas del ventilador. De ser necesario, ajústelas o reemplácelas.
3. Inspeccione el refrigerante para asegurarse de que proporcione la protección adecuada.
4. Inspeccione la empaquetadura de la tapa del radiador.
5. Inspeccione todas las mangueras para ver si tienen fugas.
6. Verifique el estado de todas las conexiones a masa del motor.

INTERVALOS DE 3000 HORAS O DOS AÑOS

1. Dé servicio a todos los componentes cuyos intervalos de mantenimiento sean menores de 3000 horas.
2. Drene, limpie y vuelva a llenar el sistema de enfriamiento.
3. Inspeccione las aletas y los protectores del ventilador, las mangueras y las abrazaderas. Apriete todas las abrazaderas.
4. Es recomendable hacer un análisis del refrigerante.

Localización de Problemas

Los tres problemas básicos que se encuentran en los sistemas de enfriamiento son:

· Recalentamiento.
· Exceso de enfriamiento.
· Pérdida de refrigerante.

Primero, se debe efectuar una inspección visual para determinar la causa de un problema en el sistema de enfriamiento. Si no se puede diagnosticar el problema, se deben de utilizar herramientas especiales para encontrar la causa.

Resumen

El mantenimiento del sistema de enfriamiento es SU RESPONSABILIDAD. Si invierte un poco de tiempo adicional en el cuidado del sistema de enfriamiento, puede prolongar la duración del motor y bajar el coste de funcionamiento.

Las consecuencias de seleccionar un refrigerante adecuado y de no mantener el sistema de enfriamiento de la manera debida son obvias. Los fallos relacionados con el refrigerante y la pérdida de eficiencia influyen directamente en el funcionamiento de su máquina.

Si escoge el refrigerante adecuado y lo mantiene de forma debida, su motor funcionará mejor a largo plazo.

_________________
Gustavo

FZJ80L
RRC V8 4,2 EFI LWB
RRC V8 3,9 EFI
RRC V8 3,5
FJ45
FJ40

 Perfil  

Desconectado
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 03 Sep 2007, 11:18
Mensajes: 1480
Ubicación: San Isidro

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 16:25 
Arriba  
sbacci escribiste:
¿Cual seria el anticongelante recomendado para el 300 tdi que se consigue por estas tierras?


Los manuales de nuestros vehículos nos informan sobre la especificación química del tipo de refrigerante que necesitan, fijate que dice......, nunca tuve un 300 TDI pero lo más probable es que necesite un refrigerante diluido al 50 % a base de Etinel Glicol.
Con este dato, anda a un lubricentro y leete las etiquetes de los tachitos que hay en venta.
No le des bola a lo que te quieren vender.

Seguramente algún asiduo usuario de estos motores me corrija si me equivoco.

Saludos.

_________________
Gustavo

FZJ80L
RRC V8 4,2 EFI LWB
RRC V8 3,9 EFI
RRC V8 3,5
FJ45
FJ40

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 08 Ago 2007, 21:49
Mensajes: 831
Ubicación: Bariloche

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 17:02 
Arriba  
Si Gusta, el manual de la Defender 1997 dice, copio textual,

"Anticongelante con base de etilenglicol (que no contenga metanol) con inhibidores de corrosion no fosfatados adecuados para motores de aluminio. Use una parte de anticongelante por una parte de agua para proteccion hasta -36Cº."

Pero mi pregunta apuntaba mas a la marca y a la experiencia que hayan tenido con alguna en particular. Porque como decia se encontro oxido entre los recambios, aunque el refrigerante utilizado era en base al etilenglicol... pero me quedo la duda de la causa. Ahora el circuito se limpio en su totalidad. Vere que se observa en el siguiente cambio...

Saludos!
Silvia

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 07 Ago 2007, 14:04
Mensajes: 3531
Ubicación: Tigre

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 17:17 
Arriba  
Básicamente, el post que copió German dice que si bien casi todos los refrigerantes están hechos a base de etilenglicol para bajar el punto de ebullición, tienen los típicos aditivos antioxidantes en base a silicatos, fosfatos y boratos que se descomponen a los 2 años y los sedimentos obstruyen el circuito. Aún cuando se cambie cada 2 años, asimismo quedan restos del refrigerante viejo ( a veces más del 30% porque no se purga bien) y éstos también contaminan el refrigerante.
Que la solución que encontró GM a partir del Dex-cool (texaco) comercializado como Havoline Long Life es que los aditivos son acidos orgánicos y que la duración es de 5 años.
saludos, Max

 Perfil  

Desconectado
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 03 Sep 2007, 11:18
Mensajes: 1480
Ubicación: San Isidro

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 17:29 
Arriba  
sbacci escribiste:
Si Gusta, el manual de la Defender 1997 dice, copio textual,

"Anticongelante con base de etilenglicol (que no contenga metanol) con inhibidores de corrosion no fosfatados adecuados para motores de aluminio. Use una parte de anticongelante por una parte de agua para proteccion hasta -36Cº."

Pero mi pregunta apuntaba mas a la marca y a la experiencia que hayan tenido con alguna en particular. Porque como decia se encontro oxido entre los recambios, aunque el refrigerante utilizado era en base al etilenglicol... pero me quedo la duda de la causa. Ahora el circuito se limpio en su totalidad. Vere que se observa en el siguiente cambio...

Saludos!
Silvia


Shellzone o Glacelf al 50 %

Saludos.

_________________
Gustavo

FZJ80L
RRC V8 4,2 EFI LWB
RRC V8 3,9 EFI
RRC V8 3,5
FJ45
FJ40

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 08 Ago 2007, 21:49
Mensajes: 831
Ubicación: Bariloche

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 17:29 
Arriba  
Si, lei el articulo que puso German, Max. ¿Sabes si se consigue el Havoline Long Life en Argentina?

 Perfil  

Desconectado
Avatar de Usuario

Registrado: 03 Sep 2007, 11:18
Mensajes: 1480
Ubicación: San Isidro

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 17:35 
Arriba  
sbacci escribiste:
Si, lei el articulo que puso German, Max. ¿Sabes si se consigue el Havoline Long Life en Argentina?


http://lubrilandia.com.ar/Texaco/gama_d ... d_life.htm

Saludos

_________________
Gustavo

FZJ80L
RRC V8 4,2 EFI LWB
RRC V8 3,9 EFI
RRC V8 3,5
FJ45
FJ40

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 08 Ago 2007, 21:49
Mensajes: 831
Ubicación: Bariloche

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 17:52 
Arriba  
Gracias Gustavo. Se consigue entonces. Que bueno! Aca-ta la hoja tecnica del producto, en castellano. Duración 5 años, 150000 millas :shock: Guau!

http://www.gaussmaq.com.ar/descargas/HA ... 20LIFE.pdf

Saludos!
Silvia

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 07 Ago 2007, 14:04
Mensajes: 3531
Ubicación: Tigre

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 18:41 
Arriba  
Silvia, te lo decía por ésto:
" Porque como decia se encontro oxido entre los recambios, aunque el refrigerante utilizado era en base al etilenglicol... pero me quedo la duda de la causa. "

Según el artículo, la causa no sería el etilenglicol sino los aditivos antioxidantes.

Ahora, éstas discusiones son de nunca acabar. Es como el tema de los aditivos para el aceite ó el combustible. El día de mañana va a aparecer un artículo diciendo que en realidad los carboxilatos son malos porque . . . y lo que hay que usar es Refriger-Plus Extra-cool

Creo que lo que rescato de importante en todo ésto es la importancia de purgar bien el contenido de todo el circuito y fundamentalmente reemplazar el líquido periódicamente.
saludos, Max
En tu caso (y en el mío) seguramente se vuelve a formar óxido enseguida porque no se debe haber sacado bien todo el circuito y ahora ya está incrustado y contaminado

 Perfil  

Desconectado

Registrado: 08 Ago 2007, 21:49
Mensajes: 831
Ubicación: Bariloche

Mensaje sin leer Publicado: 05 May 2010, 19:38 
Arriba  
Citar:
Según el artículo, la causa no sería el etilenglicol sino los aditivos antioxidantes.


Si, pero supuestamente las marcas reconocidas de refrigerantes tienen antioxidantes tambien...

Concuerdo que lo mas expeditivo es usar un producto reconocido apropiado, cambiarlo periodicamente, y purgar todo el sistema, block incluido (no solo drenar el radiador... :? )

Saludos!
Silvia

 Perfil  
Mostrar mensajes previos:  Ordenar por  
Nuevo tema Responder al tema  [ 23 mensajes ]  Ir a página 1, 2  Siguiente

Saltar a:  


¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el Foro y 2 invitados

No podes abrir nuevos temas en este Foro
No podes responder a temas en este Foro
No podes editar tus mensajes en este Foro
No podes borrar tus mensajes en este Foro
No podes enviar adjuntos en este Foro
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group :: Style based on FI Subice by phpBBservice.nl :: Todos los horarios son UTC - 3 horas
Traducción al Español Argentino por phpBB Argentina con la colaboración de phpbb-es.com